24 March 2010

TV-41 in North Korea / TV-41 in Coreea de Nord

Nu am avut "sansa" sa calatoresc in Coreea de nord insa am auzit, si am vazut in imagini, ca un model de taxi relativ raspandit este celebra noastra Dacie 1310. insa se pare ca si TV-ul a ajuns pe acolo. E vorba de un rar TV-41M produs intre 1967 si 1972. A fost primul model TV care s-a exportat desi a fost o tentativa la TV-4M (1964-67), sau cel putin s-a produs o brosura. Numarul de 41-uri si 51-uri astazi in tara e foarte mic, in oirce caz nu depaseste 10-15. Inca mai sunt cateva in Cehia si Germania, tari care mai pastreaza asa ceva, restul s-au dus si am ramas doar cu memorii. TV-41 e cel mai vechi tip de TV care mai exista, modelele anterioare fiind extincte...

In Pyongyang multe masini si mai ales camioane au o viata extrem de lunga. E un obicei local sa pui o stea pe cabina unui camion care semnifica 50,000 km fara accidente. Nu e rar sa vezi modele vechi sovietice cu 10, 15 sau in unele cazuri 20 de stele. Ma intreb cate stele o fi luat frumosul microbuz TV sau daca, undeva in ultima tara cu adevarat comunista, inca isi mai taraie rotile...


I've not had the dubious honour of visiting north Korea but I'm reliably infromed that quite a popular taxi model is still the 190s Dacia 1310. But it seems as if the Dcia was not the only model that made it over. This postcard show a rare TV-41M made between 1967 and 1972. It was the first TV model to be exported although a brcure does exist o the earler TV-4M (1964-67) model. Today the 41/51 series (51 denotes 4x4) is very rare, the number in Romania not exceeding 10-15. Some also exist abroad, notably in Germany or the Czech republic where they look after these things somewhat better. Former models are completely extinct.

Cars and trucks in Pyongyang have an extremely had life. Local custom says that lorries carry a proud star on the side signifying 50,000 accident-free kilometres. It's not unusual to see 10, 15 or even 20 stars. I wonder how many this TV had the chance to ratchet up or indeed if, somewhere in North Korea, it's still plying its trade...

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